Artículos con la etiqueta ‘estadística y probabilidad’

Generalized friendship paradox in complex networks

Por • 15 ene, 2014 • Category: sociologia

The friendship paradox states that your friends have on average more friends than you have. Does the paradox “hold'” for other individual characteristics like income or happiness? To address this question, we generalize the friendship paradox for arbitrary node characteristics in complex networks.



A statistical physics perspective on criticality in financial markets

Por • 28 oct, 2013 • Category: Ambiente

Stock markets are complex systems exhibiting collective phenomena and particular features such as synchronization, fluctuations distributed as power-laws, non-random structures and similarity to neural networks. Such specific properties suggest that markets operate at a very special point. Financial markets are believed to be critical by analogy to physical systems but few statistically founded evidence have been given. Through a data-based methodology and comparison to simulations inspired by statistical physics of complex systems, we show that the Dow Jones and indices sets are not rigorously critical. However, financial systems are closer to the criticality in the crash neighborhood.



Spatiotemporal features of human mobility

Por • 5 feb, 2012 • Category: sociologia

The individual movements of large numbers of people are important in many contexts, from urban planning to disease spreading. Datasets that capture human mobility are now available and many interesting features have been discovered, including the ultra-slow spatial growth of individual mobility. However, the detailed substructures and spatiotemporal flows of mobility-the sets and sequences of visited locations-have not been well studied. We show that individual mobility is dominated by small groups of frequently visited, dynamically close locations, forming primary “habitats” capturing typical daily activity, along with subsidiary habitats representing additional travel. These habitats do not correspond to typical contexts such as home or work. The temporal evolution of mobility within habitats, which constitutes most motion, is universal across habitats and exhibits scaling patterns both distinct from all previous observations and unpredicted by current models. The delay to enter subsidiary habitats is a primary factor in the spatiotemporal growth of human travel. Interestingly, habitats correlate with non-mobility dynamics such as communication activity, implying that habitats may influence processes such as information spreading and revealing new connections between human mobility and social networks.